The Meeting House at the Shelburne Museum in Shelburne

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The Meeting House was built in 1840 for a Methodist congregation in Charlotte, Vermont. The building’s triangular pediment is distinctive of the Greek Revival style, and the plainness of its exterior is typical of New England Protestant architecture. Inside, however, are an elaborately carved working organ and fascinating trompe l’oeil (“fool-the-eye”) murals.

The building became the home for an amateur theatrical group in 1899 and then was used as a library after 1902. After a heavy windstorm damaged the building, it was moved to the Museum in 1952 for preservation.

 

Shelburne Museum’s Lighthouse. Shelburne Vermont

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The Lighthouse was built in 1871 to mark three reefs between Vermont and New York. Because it had to endure strong lake winds, it is solidly built with a post-and-beam frame and one-and-a-half-inch thick iron rods. In 1952, the abandoned Lighthouse was dismantled from its site on the lake and re-constructed at the Museum.

The Steamboat Ticonderoga at Shelburne Museum, Shelburne, Vermont.

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The steamboat Ticonderoga is one of two remaining side-paddle-wheel passenger steamers with a vertical beam engine of the type that provided freight and passenger service on America’s bays, lakes and rivers from the early 19th to the mid-20th centuries. Commissioned by the Champlain Transportation Company, Ticonderoga was built in 1906 at the Shelburne Shipyard in Shelburne, Vermont on Lake Champlain.