The Meeting House at the Shelburne Museum in Shelburne

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The Meeting House was built in 1840 for a Methodist congregation in Charlotte, Vermont. The building’s triangular pediment is distinctive of the Greek Revival style, and the plainness of its exterior is typical of New England Protestant architecture. Inside, however, are an elaborately carved working organ and fascinating trompe l’oeil (“fool-the-eye”) murals.

The building became the home for an amateur theatrical group in 1899 and then was used as a library after 1902. After a heavy windstorm damaged the building, it was moved to the Museum in 1952 for preservation.

 

The Rockingham Meeting House in Rockingham

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The Rockingham Meeting House, also known as Old North Meeting House and First Church in Rockingham, is a historic civic and religious building on Meeting House Road in Rockingham, Vermont, United States.

Haskell Free Library and Opera House in Derby Line.

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The library collection and the opera stage are located in Stanstead, but the main entrance and most opera seats are located in Derby Line. Because of this, the Haskell is sometimes called “the only library in the U.S.A. with no books” and “the only opera house in the U.S.A. with no stage”. There is no entrance from Canada, however there is an emergency exit on the Canadian side of the building. All patrons and visitors must use the US entrance to access the building. Patrons from Canada are permitted to enter the US door without needing to report to customs, providing they return to Canada immediately upon leaving the building.

Winter at the Old Round Church in Richmond, Vermont

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The Round Church, also known as the Old Round Church, is a historic church on Round Church Road in Richmond, Vermont. Built in 1812–1813, it is a rare, well-preserved example of a sixteen-sided meeting house. It was built to serve as the meeting place for the town as well as five Protestant congregations. Today it is maintained by the Richmond Historical Society and is open to the public during the summer and early fall, It is also available for weddings and other events. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1996 for the rarity of its form and its exceptional state of preservation.